THYROID DISORDERS- A CONDITION TRENDING IN FEMALES

Thyroid disorders are now found in majority of females. You surely know someone close to you suffering from thyroid disorders. Have you ever wondered what are the causes of these condition and why it is becoming so common?

Thyroid is a small gland at the base of your neck that makes thyroid hormone. Thyroid hormone controls many activities in your body, including how fast you burn calories and how fast your heart beats. Diseases of the thyroid cause it to make either too much or too little of the hormone. Depending on how much or how little hormone your thyroid makes, you may often feel restless or tired, or you may lose or gain weight. Women are more likely than men to have thyroid diseases, especially right after pregnancy and after menopause.

Some people are more likely than others to develop thyroid problems, and although you can’t prevent thyroid disease, it’s important to detect it early.

THYROID GLAND

 

ARE YOU AT RISK FOR THYROID DISEASE?

Thyroid disease is a common cause of hormonal imbalance in the body. The thyroid can make either too much thyroid hormone i.e. hyperthyroidism or too little thyroid hormone i.e.  hypothyroidism.

Thyroid disease generally isn’t preventable, but awareness of risk factors and symptoms, can help prevent serious complications if you do have a thyroid disorder.

Signs and symptoms of thyroid disease:

 

HYPOTHYROISISM HYPERTHYROIDISM
Constipation Eating more than usual
Muscle weakness Feeling nervous or anxious
Feeling cold when other are not feeling cold Feeling irritable
Feeling sad or depressed Trouble in sleeping
Pale or dry skin Feeling hot when other are not
Joint or muscle pain Muscle weakness
Weight gain even when you are not eating much Weight loss even when you are eating properly
Puffy face Trembling in hands and fingers
Slow heart rate Irregular heart beat
More than usual menstrual bleeding Fewer and lighter menstrual periods than normal
Less sweating Increased sweating
Dry or thinning of hair Diarhhoea or more bowel movements than normal
Feeling very tired  
Hoarse voice  

 

HOW DOES THYROID GLAND WORK?

The thyroid is part of the endocrine system, which is made up of glands that produce, store, and release hormones into the bloodstream so the hormones can reach the body’s cells. The thyroid gland uses iodine from the foods you eat to make two main hormones:

  • Triiodothyronine (T3)
  • Thyroxine (T4)

 

Thyroid gland releases hormones that control metabolism—the way your body uses energy. The thyroid’s hormones regulate vital body functions, including:

  • Breathing
  • Heart rate
  • Central and peripheral nervous systems
  • Body weight
  • Muscle strength
  • Menstrual cycles
  • Body temperature
  • Cholesterol levels

WHAT ARE THE FOODS THAT SUPPORT THYROID FUNCTIONS?

 

Many nutritional factors play a role in optimizing thyroid function. However, both nutrient deficiencies and excesses can trigger or exacerbate symptoms.

The following list offers whole food sources containing the necessary vitamins and minerals needed to help our thyroid stay healthy and work properly.

 

THROID NUTRITION


IODINE

Salmon, shrimp, oysters, sardines, Iodized sea salt, Eggs, spinach, garlic, asparagus, mushrooms, sesame seeds, lima beans

SELENIUM

Tuna, mushrooms, beef, sunflower seeds, Brazil nuts, organ meats, soybeans.

ZINC

Beef, turkey, lamb, fresh oysters, sardines, soybeans, walnuts, sunflower seeds, Brazil nuts, almonds, split peas, whole grains.

COPPER

Oysters, lobster, beef, nuts, sunflower seeds, beans (white beans, chickpeas, soybeans), mushrooms, tomato paste, dark chocolate.

IRON

Organ meats, oysters, spinach, lentils, soybeans, white beans, pumpkin seeds.

VITAMIN A

Broccoli, asparagus, lettuce, carrots, spinach, sweet potatoes, liver, pumpkin.

VITAMIN C

Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, parsley, peppers (chili, Bell, sweet), strawberries, guava, papaya, citrus, kiwifruit.

VITAMIN E

Peanuts, almonds, sunflower seeds, beans and soybeans, asparagus, leafy green vegetables, whole grains, liver.

VITAMIN B2

Egg yolks, organ meats, wheat germ, Brewer’s yeast, mushrooms, almonds

VITAMIN B3

Poultry (white meat), peanuts (with skin), wheat bran, rice bran, liver, Brewer’s yeast

VITAMIN B6

Fish (tuna, trout, salmon), liver, bananas, brown rice, wheat germ, sunflower seeds, walnuts, beans (soybeans, lima beans), Brewer’s yeast.

WHAT ARE THE FOODS THAT DISRUPT THYROID FUNCTIONS?

FOODS AVOIDED FOR THYROID

SOYA

There are some studies showing that the isoflavones in soybeans can inhibit the enzyme which adds iodine to the thyroid hormone known as thyroid peroxidase (TPO). These studies indicate that soy isoflavone might bond with the iodine we do have, diminishing the reserve for thyroid production. The issue lies with the levels of iodine we have. If levels are sufficient, eating natural soy should not be a problem. Natural soy is a tremendous help to many women in regulating menopause symptoms, so this is an important nutrient to consider.

 

BRASSICA FAMILY OF VEGETABLES:

This group of vegetables includes brussel sprouts, cauliflower, broccoli, and cabbage, which studies show can reduce the thyroid hormone in a similar way to soy. Goiter, an enlarged thyroid, is linked to iodine deficiency. The compounds categorized as goitrogens can be found in small amounts in many other foods as well, including spinach, peanuts, and strawberries. It’s ok to eat them, but by pairing them with iodine-rich foods, we can counteract the metabolization reducing iodine.

GLUTEN:

There is a distinct connection between gluten intolerance, celiac disease, and autoimmune thyroid issues. This is the one food I strongly recommend to avoid if you have a thyroid condition. Gluten is found in many foods, and can trigger a whole series of digestive issues and hormonal imbalances.

 

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4 thoughts on “THYROID DISORDERS- A CONDITION TRENDING IN FEMALES

  1. My main problem is that I eat a whole lot of brussel sprouts, cauliflower, broccoli, and cabbage and then there is the spinach, peanuts and strawberries as well. Yes, my tsh numbers are high. Fatigue is my number one symptom. I feel exhausted often, even after getting 7-8 hours of sleep.

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    1. Hi Kenneth. If you stop eating brussel sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage and broccoli, you might be able to solve your problem for fatigue. These foods affect your tsh levels nd further affects your body functions.. so certain restrictions and you can feel the change.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thanks for your comment.
        I visited my family doctor and she ran some blood tests. Apparently my thyroid (tsh) numbers are good, it’s my cholesterol that is out of wack.
        If it’s not one thing, it’s something else. (sigh)
        I’m actually thinking it’s a thyroid issue. I can’t seem to lose weight, I get fatigued easily and I’m irritable more often (my wife says).
        *Small steps to better health, I didn’t get this bad overnight, you know*

        Like

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